BIMA (BIOTECNOLOGIE INDUSTRIALI, MOLECOLARI E AMBIENTALI)

Research:

ANTARCTIC MARINE BACTERIA: FROM ECOPHYSIOLOGY STUDIES TO INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

BIOPLASTICS FROM WASTES: CIRCULAR ECONOMY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED BIOCATALYSTS AND BIOSYSTEMS TO PRODUCE ANTIOXIDANTS, ETHANOL, BIOPOLYMERS AND FINE/BULK CHEMICALS FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS AND WASTE VALORIZATION.

ENZYMATIC ROUTES FOR GREEN INDUSTRY

POST-TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS

PROTEOMICS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF CELL MECHANISMS AND PROTEIN COMPLEXES

PROTEOMICS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

REGULATION OF BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT IN GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA: NEW ANTIMICROBIAL STRATEGIES

SELF-ASSEMBLING PROTEIN BIOSURFACTANTS: NEW TOOLS FOR GREEN APPLICATIONS

TARGETED PROTEOMICS AND METABOLOMICS

ANTARCTIC MARINE BACTERIA: FROM ECOPHYSIOLOGY STUDIES TO INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

Antarctic marine bacteria are being explored either for their molecular mechanisms of adaptation to stressing growth conditions or for the exotic chemical repertoire expressed by indigenous microbiota. The number of reports on successful isolation of novel molecules from these bacteria endowed with antimicrobial, anti-fouling, anti-cancer and biotechnological-relevant activities is steadily increasing. The Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 is also considered one of the most promising non conventional cell-factories for the recombinant production of difficult proteins. Our research activities are focused on the use of cold-loving bacteria either as a source of bioactive compounds to be used in several industrial and biomedical application, or as host for the recombinant protein production. These two research lines are pursued by up to date methodologies, spanning from molecular biology techniques, protein purification and characterization methods, small molecule purification and characterization. The group has also a deep expertise in the use of automatic bioreactor for the production of bioactive products.

 

Selected publications:

  • F. Sannino, C. Sansone, C. Galasso, S. Kildgaard, P. Tedesco, R. Fani, G. Marino, D. de Pascale. A. Ianora, E. Parrilli, T. O. Larsen, G. Romano, M. L. Tutino. Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 produces 4-hydroxybenzoic acid that induces pyroptosis in human A459 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Sci Rep. (2018) Jan 19;8(1):1190
  • E. Parrilli, M. L. Tutino. Heterologous Protein Expression in Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. In: Margesin R. (eds) Psychrophiles: From Biodiversity to Biotechnology. (2017) Springer, Champp 513-525
  • A. Casillo, R. Papa, A. Ricciardelli, F. Sannino, M. Ziaco, M. Tilotta, L. Selan, G. Marino, M. M. Corsaro, M. L. Tutino, M. Artini, E. Parrilli. Anti-Biofilm Activity of a Long-Chain Fatty Aldehyde from Antarctic Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 against Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. (2017) 23;7:46
  • F. Sannino ,M. Giuliani ,U. Salvatore U,G. A. Apuzzo, D. de Pascale , R. Fani, M. Fondi, G. Marino, M. L. Tutino, E. Parrilli. A novel synthetic medium and expression system for subzero growth and recombinant protein production in Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. (2017); 101:725-734.
  • J. L. Corchero , B. Gasser , D. Resina , W. Smith , E. Parrilli, F. Vázquez , I. Abasolo , M. Giuliani , J. Jäntti, . Ferrer, M. Saloheimo, D. Mattanovich, Schwartz Jr, L. Tutino ,A. Villaverde. Unconventional microbial systems for the cost-efficient production of high-quality protein therapeutics. Biotechnol Adv. (2013); 31:140-53.

Involved people

  • Andrea Colarusso, 31st PhD cycle in Biotechnology, Project Title: Design, production and structural and functional characterization of brain-targeted delivery systems for the use of CNF1 as a protein therapeutic in the treatment of CNS disorders;
  • Annarita Ricciardelli, 31st PhD cycle in Biotechnology, Project Title: Sustainable use of marine biodiversity as source of novel antifouling and antibiofilm agents in industrial and clinical settings;
  • Concetta Lauro, 33rd PhD cycle in Biotechnology, Project Title: Geno-proteomic approaches to engineer Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 as a system for the production of recombinant proteins.

BIOPLASTICS FROM WASTES: CIRCULAR ECONOMY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

The Circular Economy (CE) purpose can be described by the "3R" principle: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle of materials and energy: following this principle, wastes should be regarded as valuable resources. Within the CE frame, this research line addresses the valorization of waste materials for the sustainable production of biopolymers. Biopolymers are attractive "green" alternatives to conventional petroleum-based plastics. Our research activity is focused on the designing of engineered microorganisms for the production of microbial biopolymers, Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Fine tuning of microbial metabolic background has allowed the designing of ad hoc cell factories for the production of the polymer of interest. In view of process sustainability, greener alternatives to commonly used organic solvents are currently being tested for PHA recovery. Furthermore, research activity also focuses on the exploitation of enzymatic tools for polymer functionalisation providing tailor-made biopolymers for different applications (food packaging, medical engineering and drug delivery).

Main collaboration:

Mario Malinconico, CNR-Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials IPCB, Via C. Flegrei 34, 80078 Naples;

Danilo Porro, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan 20126, Italy;

Georg Guebitz, Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology GmbH, Division Enzymes & Polymers, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430, Tulln an der Donau, Austria.

 

Selected publications:

  • M. Vastano, A. Pellis, B. Immirzi, G. Dal Poggetto, M. Malinconico, G. Sannia, G. M. Guebitz, C. Pezzella, "Enzymatic production of clickable and PEGylated recombinant polyhydroxyalkanoates" Green Chem. (2017),19,5494-5504
  • C. Pezzella, M. Vastano, A. Casillo, M.M. Corsaro, G. Sannia, "Production of bioplastic from waste oils by recombinant Escherichia coli: a pit-stop in waste frying oil to bio-diesel conversion race." ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT JOURNAL (2016), 15, 2003-2010
  • M. Vastano, A. Casillo, M.M. Corsaro, G. Sannia, C. Pezzella, "Production of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates from waste oils by recombinant Escherichia coli." ENGINEERING IN LIFE SCIENCES (2015), 15,700-709

Involved people

  • Iolanda Corrado, 31st PhD cycle in Biotechnology; Project Title: Microbial Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs): sustainable production and applications.
  • Cinzia Pezzella, Post-Doc on Project BEETOUT - Sugar Beet biorefinery for the integrated production of biofuel and polyesters. Fondazione CARIPLO, Industrial Biotechnology.
  • Simona Giacobbe, Post-Doc
  • Marco Vastano, Post-Doc

Active grants

  • Project BEETOUT - Sugar Beet biorefinery for the integrated production of biofuel and polyesters. Fondazione CARIPLO, Industrial Biotechnology

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED BIOCATALYSTS AND BIOSYSTEMS TO PRODUCE ANTIOXIDANTS, ETHANOL, BIOPOLYMERS AND FINE/BULK CHEMICALS FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS AND WASTE VALORIZATION.

Novel feruloyl esterases and glucuronyl esterases were developed to replace chemical processes for the production of antioxidants for the cosmetics with bioconversions based on esterification reactions. In order to produce biofuels and high‐added value bioproducts with applications in chemical and plastic industries, a toolkit of cellulases, hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes with better performances in hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose was developed. The improved biocatalysts are developed by both isolation from new microorganims and genetic engineering and metagenomics approaches. Faraco's labs are equipped with an automated workstation consisting of the robots Colony Picker QPix450 (Molecular Devices) and Biomek® NX for automatic manipulation and analysis of thousands of microorganisms and enzymes.

Main collaboration:

Collaborations in the frame of the project "Enhanced bioconversion of agricultural residues through cascading use" (BIOrescue), "H2020-BBI-PPP-2015-2-1", contract number 720708

 

Selected publications:

  • A. Pennacchio, V. Ventorino, D. Cimini, O. Pepe, C. Schiraldi, M. Inverso, V. Faraco. Isolation of new cellulase and xylanase producing strains and application to lignocellulosic biomasses hydrolysis and succinic acid production. Bioresour Technol. (2018); 259:325-333.
  • A. Dilokpimol, M. Mäkelä, S. Varriale, M. Zhou, G. Cerullo, L. Gidijal, H. Hinkka, J. Brás, P. Jütten, A. Piechot, R. Verhaert, K. S. Hildén, V. Faraco, R. P. de Vries. Fungal feruloyl esterases: Functional validation of genome mining based enzyme discovery including uncharacterized subfamilies. New Biotechnology (2018); 41:9-14.
  • V. Ventorino, E. Ionata, L. Birolo, S. Montella, L. Marcolongo, A. de Chiaro, F. Espresso, V. Faraco, O. Pepe. Lignocellulose-Adapted Endo-Cellulase Producing Streptomyces Strains for Bioconversion of Cellulose-Based Materials. Front Microbiol. (2016);7:2061.
  • V. Faraco. Discovery of genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzyme by metagenomic analysis of lignocellulosic biomasses. Sci Rep. (2017) 15;7:42623.
  • D. Iandolo, A. Amore, L. Birolo, G. Leo, G. Olivieri and V. Faraco. Fungal solid state fermentation on agro-industrial wastes for acid wastewater decolourization in a continuous flow packed-bed bioreactor Bioresource Technology (2011); 102, 7603-7607

Involved people

  • Valentina Mauriello, 32nd PhD cycle in Biotechnology, Project Title: "Development of improved cellulase variants for Spent Mushroom Substrate conversion by directed evolution".
  • Anna Pennacchio, Post-Doc;
  • Gabriella Cerullo, Post-Doc.

ENZYMATIC ROUTES FOR GREEN INDUSTRY

Laccases (EC1.10.3.2) are a family of multi-copper containing oxidoreductases enzymes able to catalyze the oxidation of various aromatic compounds using air oxygen and producing water as the only byproduct. Over the past decades, laccases have attracted the efforts of many researchers in the environmental and biotechnological fields because of their great potential to be alternative catalysts to the conventional chemical synthetic processes with no hazardous side effects. Indeed, different applications have been established with laccases, such as in the bioremediation field, in fruit juice clarification, and in dye synthesis. More recently, these oxidative enzymes are being tested for their ability to catalyze the polymerization of phenols and their various derivatives. It is well known that polymeric materials are essential for everyday life, being present in many and different fields.

Main collaboration:

Eric Record INRA, Biotechnologie des Champignons Filamenteux, Aix -Marseille Université, France;

Dietmar Schossler, Department of Environmental Microbiology Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ Leipzig, Germany;

Thierry Tron, AMU iSm2 Aix -Marseille Université, France.

 

Selected publications:

  • A. Piscitelli, V. Tarallo, L. Guarino, G. Sannia, L. Birolo, C. Pezzella, "New lipases by mining of Pleurotus ostreatus genome" PLoS One. (2017), 12(9):e0185377.
  • C. Pezzella, V.G. Giacobelli, V. Lettera, G. Olivieri, P. Cicatiello, G. Sannia, A. Piscitelli, "A step forward in laccase exploitation: recombinant production and evaluation of techno-economic feasibility of the process" J Biotechnol (2017), 259,175-181.
  • C. Pezzella, G. Macellaro, G. Sannia, F. Raganati, G. Olivieri, A. Marzocchella, D. Schlosser, A. Piscitelli, "Exploitation of Trametes versicolor for bioremediation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in bioreactors" PLoS One. (2017), 12(6):e0178758.
  • C. Pezzella, L. Guarino, A. Piscitelli, "How to enjoy laccases" Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2015), 72,923-40.
  • C. Pezzella, V. Lettera, A. Piscitelli, P. Giardina, G. Sannia, "Transcriptional analysis of Pleurotus ostreatus laccase genes" Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. (2013), 97,705-717

Active grants

  • BIOECONOMY IN THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY (http://masterbiocirce.com/)

    BIOCIRCE is an interdisciplinary II Level: Master jointly offered by 4 Universities (University of Bologna, University of Milano-Bicocca, University of Napoli Federico II, University of Torino) 4 non-academic partners (Intesa Sanpaolo, Novamont SpA, GFBiochemicals SpA, PTP Science Park di Lodi). The program includes four compulsory modules (5 Credits each) delivered by the four participating Universities. Modules cover relevant scientific topics as well as economic and legal issues. Each module envisages teaching of scientific topics by staff members of the participating Universities, whilst economic and regulatory aspects, as well as specific case studies, are covered by members of participating companies and associations. The four modules are followed by a six months industrial stage in a company or institution (30 credits). The stage will be completed after the submission of a dissertation thesis (10 credits) reporting on the project carried out during the stage. Giovanni Sannia is President of BIOCIRCE since 2016

POST-TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS

Posttranslational modification of proteins refers to the chemical changes proteins may undergo after translation. Such modifications are mostly catalyzed by enzymes that recognize specific target sequences in specific proteins. The most common modifications are the covalent addition or removal of low-molecular-weight groups, such as acetylation, glycation (nonenzymatic conjugation with carbohydrates), glycosylation (enzymatic conjugation with carbohydrates), phosphorylation, oxidation, etc. Posttranslational modifications play a fundamental role in regulating the folding of proteins, their targeting to specific subcellular compartments, their interaction with ligands or other proteins, and their functional state. A very powerful way to study posttranslational modifications is by ‘proteomics', an extremely rapid and sensitive methodology for the systematic identification of proteins. This involves separation of proteins (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, affinity chromatography etc) followed by mass spectrometry. The technique reveals very precisely the site and nature of posttranslational modifications.

 

Selected publications:

  • Carpentieri A., Gamberi T., Modesti A., Amoresano A., Colombini B., Nocella M., Bagni M. A., Fiaschi T., Barolo L., Gulisano M., Magherini F. Profiling Carbonylated Proteins in Heart and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria from Trained and Untrained Mice. JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, (2016), 15: 3666-3678-3678
  • Hoja-Łukowicz D, Link-Lenczowski P, Carpentieri A, Amoresano A, Pocheć E, Artemenko KA, Bergquist J, Lityńska A.. L1CAM from human melanoma carries a novel type of N-glycan with Galβ1-4Galβ1- motif. Involvement of N-linked glycans in migratory and invasive behavior of melanoma cells. GLYCOCONJUGATE JOURNAL (2013), 30: 205-225
  • Chatterjee A, Carpentieri A, Ratner DM, Bullitt E, Costello CE, Robbins PW, Samuelson J.. Giardia cyst wall protein 1 is a lectin that binds to curled fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer. PLOS PATHOGENS, (2010) 6: 1-12
  • Carpentieri A, Giangrande C, Pucci P, Amoresano A. Glycoproteome study in myocardial lesions serum by integrated mass spectrometry approach: preliminary insights. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF MASS SPECTROMETRY (2010), 16: p. 123-149
  • Carpentieri A, Ratner DM, Ghosh SK, Banerjee S, Bushkin GG, Cui J, Lubrano M, Steffen M, Costello CE, O'Keefe B, Robbins PW, Samuelson J.. The antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N targets well-known and novel targets on the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. EUKARYOTIC CELL, (2010), 9: 1661-1668

Involved people

PROTEOMICS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF CELL MECHANISMS AND PROTEIN COMPLEXES

The identification of protein components of in vivo functional complexes as well as the in vitro investigation of their three-dimensional structure constitutes a fundamental prerequisite for the elucidation of their biological functions at molecular level. The investigation of protein complexes in vivo is carried out by using functional proteomics approaches and allows the comprehension of cell mechanisms both in physiological (differentiation, protein trafficking, chromatin remodeling, viral infection mechanisms etc) and in pathological conditions, leading to the definition of the molecular basis of genetic (LSDs, Wilson Disease), chronic (diabetes) and oncologic (glioma, thyroid tumors), diseases. Protein-ligands interactions (proteins, lipids, DNA/RNA, drugs) are also investigated by using limited proteolysis and cross-lynking experiments, coupled to mass spectrometry, thus to define protein-ligand interacting regions. This approach has been successfully applied in the investigation of amylodogenic state of several proteins involved in amyloidosis, leading to a model for the description of their aggregation process.

Main collaboration:

Prof. V. Bellotti, University of Pavia and Visiting Researcher at The Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins, Royal Free and University College Medical School, UCL, London, UK;

TIGEM (Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine); IRCCS-Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza (FG); Prof.ssa C. Zuccato, Università di Milano.

 

Selected publications:

Involved people

Active grants

PROTEOMICS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

The term proteomics for cultural heritage refer to the study of proteins in ancient samples such as archaeological objects and works of art by applying proteomic strategies. In case of archaeological objects and artwork, it can reveal ancient human habits, commercial exchanges, but also important information to understand manufacturing processes, the technique used by an artist, and therefore it provides essential information for art historians. It may also support the choice of the most appropriate conservation conditions or restoration procedures. Only very recently the introduction of high-throughput mass spectrometry allowed confident identification and characterization of ancient proteins 3. This new, robust and reliable approach known as paleoproteomics can provide very innovative results in the study, diagnostics, and protection of cultural heritage collections.

Main collaboration:

Prof. M.P. Colombini, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy;

Prof. Enrico Cappellini, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

 

Selected publications:

Involved people

Active grants

REGULATION OF BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT IN GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA: NEW ANTIMICROBIAL STRATEGIES

Biofilm formation was investigated by differential proteomics approaches. In E.coli the involvement of the N-acetylneuraminase protein NanA was demonstrated; particularly the inhibition of NanA substantially decreases the formation of the biofilm. Similarly M. smegmatis biofilm formation is linked to the overexpression of the bifunctional enzyme GlmU involved in bacterial cell wall synthesis. The results obtained indicate that inhibition of NanA or GlmU strongly decreases the ability of bacteria to form biofilms, suggesting that the two enzymes could be specific targets of new therapeutic strategies. The molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial peptide Temporin-L was investigated by functional proteomics approaches and the putative peptide interactors from bacterial membrane proteins were identified by advanced mass spectrometry procedures. The results demonstrated that Temporina-L interacts with the FtsZ protein, an essential component of the divisoma complex, and with the elongasoma proteins thus inhibiting bacterial cell division.

 

Selected publications:

Involved people

SELF-ASSEMBLING PROTEIN BIOSURFACTANTS: NEW TOOLS FOR GREEN APPLICATIONS

Filamentous fungi produce proteinaceous biosurfactants, whose activity is intrinsic to the protein molecules themselves, being some hydrophobic aliphatic side chains exposed on one side of their surface, whilst polar or charged residues are confined to the other side. Among fungal biosurfactants, hydrophobins (HFB) are described as the most powerful surface-active proteins known. HFBs self-assemble and can form highly insoluble aggregates similar to amyloid fibrils (functional amyloids). The Janus-faced character of HFBs allows to tune the wettability of surfaces and they can be used for several biotechnological applications, such as surface coating and functionalization. Enzymes, peptides, antibodies and nanomaterials can be immobilized on functionalized surfaces for biosensing and biomedical applications. Up to now three HFBs were characterized and exploited for the above mentioned applications.

Main collaboration:

Luca De Stefano, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, CNR, Naples;

Giovanna Cristina Varese, Scientific Head of the Mycotheca Universitatis Taurinensis, Department of Life Sciences, University of Turin;

Alan Le Goff, CNRS, Departement de chimie moleculaire, Grenoble, France.

 

Selected publications:

Involved people

Active grants

TARGETED PROTEOMICS AND METABOLOMICS

The research activity is focused on the development of analytical methodologies in the field of qualitative and quantitative analysis of metals, small molecules, metabolites and proteins through the use of tandem mass spectrometry. The main topics are: 1) Development of new methods in proteomics for the selective analysis of post modifications with mass spectrometry in neutral loss or precursor mode; 2) Development of tandem mass spectrometry methods in Multi-Reaction Monitoring mode for the qualitative and quantitative determination of small molecules in complex mixtures (targeted metabolomics); 3) Development of tandem mass spectrometry methods in Monitoring mode with multiple reactions for the qualitative and quantitative determination of proteins in biological matrices (Targeted proteomics).

 

Selected publications:

Involved people

  • Chiara Melchiorre: 33rd PhD cycle in Chemical Sciences; Project Title: "Development of a new method for the identification of FSH glycoforms involved in human fertility"
    • M Monti, M Cozzolino, F Cozzolino, G Vitiello, R Tedesco, A Flagiello, P Pucci. Puzzle of protein complexes in vivo: a present and future challenge for functional proteomics. Expert Rev Proteomics. (2009), 6:159-169
    • D'Angelo G, Uemura T, Chuang CC, Polishchuk E, Santoro M, Ohvo-Rekilä H, Sato T, Di Tullio G, Varriale A, D'Auria S, Daniele T, Capuani F, Johannes L, Mattjus P, Monti M, Pucci P, Williams RL, Burke JE, Platt FM, Harada A, De Matteis MA. Vesicular and non-vesicular transport feed distinct glycosylation pathways in the Golgi. Nature. (2013), 501:116-20.
    • Chesi G, Hegde RN, Iacobacci S, Concilli M, Parashuraman S, Festa BP, Polishchuk EV, Di Tullio G, Carissimo A, Montefusco S, Canetti D, Monti M, Amoresano A, Pucci P, van de Sluis B, Lutsenko S, Luini A, Polishchuk RS. Identification of p38 MAPK and JNK as new targets for correction of Wilson disease-causing ATP7B mutants. Hepatology. (2016), 63:1842-59.
    • Iaconis D, Monti M, Renda M, van Koppen A, Tammaro R, Chiaravalli M, Cozzolino F, Pignata P, Crina C, Pucci P, Boletta A, Belcastro V, Giles RH, Maria Surace E, Gallo S, Pende M, Franco B. The centrosomal OFD1 protein interacts with the translation machinery and regulates the synthesis of specific targets. Sci Rep. (2017), 7:1224.
    • Zollo M., Ahmed M., Ferrucci V., Salpietro V., Asadzadeh F., Carotenuto M., Maroofian R., Al-Amri A., Singh R., Scognamiglio I., Mojarrad M., Musella L., Duilio A., Di Somma A., Karaca E., Rajab A., Al-Khayat A., Mohan Mohapatra T., Eslahi A., Ashrafzadeh F., Rawlins L. E., Prasad R., Gupta R., Kumari P., Srivastava M., Cozzolino F., Rai S. K., Monti M., Harlalka G. V., Simpson M. A., Rich P., AlSalmi F., Patton M. A.,. Chioza B. A, Efthymiou S., Granata F., Di Rosa G., Wiethoff S., Borgione E., Scuderi C., Mankad K.,. Hanna M. G., Pucci P., Houlden H., Lupski J.R., Crosby A. H. and Baple E. L. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment. Brain. (2017), 140:940-952.
    • Ilaria Iacobucci: 33rd PhD cycle in Chemical Sciences; Project Title: "In vitro and in vivo investigation of functional protein complexes"
    • Ministero della salute Giovani Ricercatori (GR-2011-02349694) Project Title: "Dissecting the TRIM8 role in the pathogenesis of glioma and therapy
    • A. Lluveras-Tenorio, R. Vinciguerra, E. Galano, C. Blaensdorf, E. Emmerling, M. P. Colombini, L. Birolo, I. Bonaduce. GC/MS and Proteomics to unravel the painting history of the lost Giant Buddhas of Bāmiyān (Afghanistan)., PLoS ONE (2017), 12 e0172990.
    • R. Vinciguerra, A. De Chiaro, P. Pucci, G. Marino, L. Birolo. Proteomic strategies for cultural heritage: form bones to paintings. Microchem. Journal (2016), 126, 341-348 DOI: 10.1016/j.microc.2015.12.024.
    • R. Vinciguerra, E. Galano, F. Vallone, G. Greco, A. Vergara, I. Bonaduce, G. Marino, P. Pucci, A. Amoresano, L. Birolo A deglycosylation step to improve the identification of egg proteins in art samples. Anal Chem, (2015), 87:10178-10182.
    • P. Villa, L. Pollarolo, I. Degano, L. Birolo, M. Pasero, C. Biagioni, K. Douka, R. Vinciguerra, J.J. Lucejko, L. Wadley. A Milk and Ochre Paint Mixture Used 49,000 Years Ago at Sibudu, South Africa. PLOS ONE, (2015), Jun 30;10(6):e0131273.
    • G. Leo, I. Bonaduce, A. Andreotti, G. Marino, P. Pucci, M.P. Colombini, L. Birolo. Deamidation at Asparagine and Glutamine as a major modification upon deterioration/aging of proteinaceous binders in mural paintings. Anal Chem, (2011), 83: 2056-64.
    • Georgia Ntasi, 33rd PhD cycle in Chemical Sciences, Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow
    • MARIE SKŁODOWSKA-CURIE ITN (Call identifier: H2020-MSCA-ITN-2016. TEMPERA: Teaching Emerging Methods in Palaeoproteomics for the European Research Area) in a network collecting the most advanced groups in Europe in paleoproteomics.
    • Di Pasquale P, Caterino M, Di Somma A, Squillace M, Rossi E, Landini P, Iebba V, Schippa S, Papa R, Selan L, Artini M, Palamara AT, Duilio A. Exposure of E. coli to DNA-Methylating Agents Impairs Biofilm Formation and Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells via Down Regulation of the N-Acetylneuraminate Lyase NanA. Front Microbiol. (2016) Feb 11;7:147.
    • Zollo M., Ahmed M., Ferrucci V., Salpietro V., Asadzadeh F., Carotenuto M., Maroofian R., Al-Amri A., Singh R., Scognamiglio I., Mojarrad M., Musella L., Duilio A., Di Somma A., Karaca E., Rajab A., Al-Khayat A., Mohan Mohapatra T., Eslahi A., Ashrafzadeh F., Rawlins L. E., Prasad R., Gupta R., Kumari P., Srivastava M., Cozzolino F., Rai S. K., Monti M., Harlalka G. V., Simpson M. A., Rich P., AlSalmi F., Patton M. A.,. Chioza B. A, Efthymiou S., Granata F., Di Rosa G., Wiethoff S., Borgione E., Scuderi C., Mankad K., Hanna M. G., Pucci P., Houlden H., Lupski J.R., Crosby A. H. and Baple E. L. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment. Brain. (2017), 140:940-952.
    • Angela Di Somma, 32nd PhD cycle in Chemical Sciences, Project Title: Regulation of biofilm development in gram negative bacteria: new antimicrobial strategies
    • A. Piscitelli, P. Cicatiello, A.M. Gravagnuolo, I. Sorrentino, C. Pezzella, P.Giardina. Applications of Functional Amyloids from Fungi: Surface Modification by Class I Hydrophobins. Biomolecules. (2017) 7, 45
    • A. Piscitelli, A. Pennacchio, P. Cicatiello, J. Politi, L. De Stefano, P. Giardina. Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of active thrombin based on the Vmh2 hydrophobin fused to a Green Fluorescent Protein. Biosensors and Bioelectronics (2017) 87, 816-822.
    • M. Artini, P. Cicatiello, A. Ricciardelli, R. Papa, L. Selan, P. Dardano, M. Tilotta, G. Vrenna, M. L. Tutino, P. Giardina, E. Parrilli Hydrophobin coating prevents Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation on different surfaces. Biofouling (2017) 33:601-611
    • P. Cicatiello, P. Dardano, M. Pirozzi, A.M. Gravagnuolo, L. De Stefano, P. Giardina. Self-assembly of two hydrophobins from marine fungi affected by interaction with surfaces. Biotechnology and Bioengineering. (2017) 114:2173-2186
    • A.M. Gravagnuolo, S. Longobardi, A. Luchini, M. S. Appavou, L. De Stefano, E. Notomista, L. Paduano, P. Giardina. Class I hydrophobin Vmh2 adopts atypical mechanism to self-assemble into functional amyloid fibrils. Biomacromolecules (2016) 17, 954-64
    • Ilaria Sorrentino, 31st PhD cycle in Biotechnology, Project Title: "Fungal self-assembling protein layers: new biotech-tools to fabricate bio/non-biohybrid devices".
    • Paola Cicatiello, Post-Doc (July 2017-June 2018), Project Title: "Immobilization of ENzymes on hydrophobin-functionalized Nanomaterials".
    • Immobilization of ENzymes on hydrophobin-functionalized NAnomaterials (IENA), Progetto di Ricerca di Ateneo, (2017-2018); Functional Amyloid chimera for Marine Biosensing (FLAshMoB), MarTERA ERA-NET Cofund (2018-2020).
    • Illiano A, Arpino V, Pinto G, Berti A, Verdoliva V, Peluso G, Pucci P, Amoresano A Multiple Reaction Monitoring Tandem Mass Spectrometry Approach for the Identification of Biological Fluids at Crime Scene Investigations.. Anal Chem. (2018) Apr 13.
    • Fontanarosa C, Pane F, Sepe N, Pinto G, Trifuoggi M, Squillace M, Errico F, Usiello A, Pucci P, Amoresano A.Quantitative determination of free D-Asp, L-Asp and N-methyl-D-aspartate in mouse brain tissues by chiral separation and Multiple Reaction Monitoring tandem mass spectrometry. PLoS One. (2017) 29;12(6):e0179748.
    • Galano E, Arciello A, Piccoli R, Monti DM, Amoresano A. A proteomic approach to investigate the effects of cadmium and lead on human primary renal cells. Metallomics. (2014);6(3):587-97.
    • Galano E, Mangiapane E, Bianga J, Palmese A, Pessione E, Szpunar J, Lobinski R, Amoresano A. Privileged incorporation of selenium as selenocysteine in Lactobacillus reuteri proteins demonstrated by selenium-specific imaging and proteomics. Mol Cell Proteomics. (2013), 12:2196-204
    • Novel method to investigate protein carbonylation by iTRAQ strategy. Palmese A, De Rosa C, Chiappetta G, Marino G, Amoresano A. Anal Bioanal Chem. (2012);404:1631-5.
    • Anna Illiano, 31st PhD cycle in Chemical Sciences, Project Title "Targeted tandem mass spectrometry strategies to quantify proteins biomarkers of inflammatory diseases".
    • Gabriella Pinto, Post doc